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224 Queen Emma Square

Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
(808) 536 6102  email us

A division of The St. Andrew's Schools

 


 The Queen Emma Collection

Featuring Artists from Aulani

Live Auction

Solomon Enos     Hanalei Hopfe & Pat Pine     Al Lagunero     Harinani Orme & Carl F.K. Pao     Jordan Souza     Dalani Tanahy     Jerry Vasconcellos

These unique contemporary art pieces each come with an opportunity to have an immersive experience with the talented kanaka maoli artist.

 ________________________________________________________________________________________

Solomon Enos, one of the most extraordinary contemporary artists to come out of Hawai’i today.

His signature pieces at Aulani evoke the colorist Minookian; and depict people and place participating in the Hawaiian season of thanksgiving, known as the Makahiki. 
 
 Solomon is currently one of the six artists in the Honolulu Museum of Art’s Tenth Biennial now showing at the Spaulding House.   Solomon has won national recognition for his alternate-history “Polyfantastica” project, shown last year at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Taking inspiration from science fiction, gaming culture and the Internet, “Polyfantastica” exists as a comic book, website, modeled figures, paintings and more. Solomon has contributed to a variety of highly visible community murals including the Bishop Museum’s Hawaiian Hall prophecy chant mural, the Helumoa Mural at the Sheraton Waikiki, the Hawaii Kakou Community Mural at the Hawaii Convention Center, and POW WOW 2012 to name a few. Solomon’s commissioned works include entrance pieces to the Sheraton Waikiki, in room art for the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, the painting, A Dozen Concrete Pillars, for architect firm WCIT and a recent multi-media exhibition renovation at Sea Life Park. 

In honor of Aulani and Queen Emma,Solomon has donated an acrylic on boxed canvas measuring 48” x 36”, entitled Sentinent Light Being #1.This piece was part of Solomon’s PEWA show with artist and co-collaborator Carl Pao and has a value of $3,650.

 The winning bidder will have the opportunity to bring up to six people to have a personal conversation with Solomon Enos about the pieces he created for the Honolulu Museum of the Art’s Tenth Biennial. Solomon will also escort the group on a tour of his work before hosting the group for a lunch at the Spaulding House restaurant.

 Maile Meyer, owner of Na Mea Hawai’i and founder of MAMO gallery and ii gallery will be a part of this group and will be happy to answer any questions about the work of other native Hawaiian artists living and working in Hawaii.

 Segment Value - $5,450

Solomon Enos boxed canvas acrylic, Sentinent Light Beings #1 - $3,650

 *Personal tour w/Solomon Enos and lunch with the artist for six - $400

 Slipcase edition of Solomon Enos illustrated epic tale of Hi'iakaikapoliopele - $1,000

 Consult on contemporary Hawaiian art with Maile Meyer - $400

*Date/time to be mutually agreed upon. Must be before the Biennial Show ends (July 22)   ________________________________________________________________________________________ 

Hanalei Hopfe wears many hats along the Wai‘anae Coast. A lineal descendant of the area, he sits on many community councils and governing boards and is a tireless advocate to improve the conditions along the coast for native Hawaiians. He brings his cultural genealogy into a mindset of creation, carving mythology and genealogy into his work.

 Hanalei is a gifted artisan focusing on stone. His basalt carvings are pōhaku gathered from the back of Hawaiian valleys along the Leeward Coast. He has worked on many commissions and sits in the collections of most ali‘i trusts. His work is the focal piece at the Aulani Resort’s Laniwai Spa. Hanalei’s pōhaku piece is a basalt carving, entitled Pueo, measuring 10” x 14” x 6” and is valued at $1,500.

Pat Pine is a descendant of the Kauaua-a-mahi clan from Hawai’i Island. He apprenticed himself to Akoni Grace at Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau on Hawai‘i Island learning the foundation of kī’i sculpting and canoe building and also apprenticed with Rocky Jensen to understand deep symbolism and native art philosophy. Pat is one of the original members of Hale Naua-III, a native Hawaiian arts organization formed in the 1970s. He also served as a master wood carver in the State Foundation’s Folk Art Apprenticeship Program. Pine continues to work in wood and stone to articulate human form and native values. He also incorporates reusable and recycled materials as well. Pat has exhibited throughout Hawai‘i and the West Coast. His works are epresented in public and private collections in the United States and abroad.

 “As time passes, my understanding of self and answers to questions of the past unfold with my daily experiences of paradise. A spiritual being having a human experience best reflects my insights.” Pat Pine

 

Pictured here is Pat’s signature ipu heke, made from niu (coconut), measuring 26” x 14” and valued at $1,200.

 

The winning bidder and up to eight guest will ‘go holoholo’ to Hopfe’s gallery, Hale o Hanalei, located by Pōkaʻi Bay. We will also visit Pineʻs Mākaha Valley Road studio. The group will have lunch at the Aulani Resort followed by a tour of the commissioned art in the main lobby area. Maile Meyer from Nā Mea Hawaii and John Condrey will be the group tour guides.

 

Segment Value: $3,500
Hanalei Hopfe basalt carving, Pueo – $1,500
Pat’s sculpture is a ipu heke, made from niu (coconut) - $1,200
*Wai‘anae Coast ‘holoholo’ art tour and lunch at Aulani Resort for up to eight people - $800

*Date/time to be mutually agreed upon

  ________________________________________________________________________________________

 Harinani Orme is an artist’s artist; dedicated to creative inquiry and celebration. Born in Honolulu and a graduate from the University of Hawaii with a BFA, she continued her studies, earning a Masters in Fine Arts at Pratt Institute of Art in New York City. She returned home to deepen her understanding of her Hawaiian roots and to explore a variety of medium. Using her printmaking and painter skills for her works on the myths, legends and traditions of old Hawai`i she believes this combination infuses certain graphic characteristics into her images and allows for a fuller expression of the narrative style. She sees her works as an ongoing process of experimentation and assemblage working patiently until the emerging images takes a life form of its own. Harinani is also a ceramist, jeweler, textile artist, installation artist, book illustrator and art educator. A trained kumu, she teaches various art forms to students of all ages in Hawaii and on the mainland. She is one of the founding directors of HOEA, a community based arts movement organized by the late Hikoula Hanapi on Hawaii Island.

Harinani worked closely with the creative designers of Aulani. Her powerful Hina and Maui images fill the thirty story exterior walls of the resort.   Harinani, standing in front of Hina, also has several pieces of original art commissioned for the resort’s VIP suites.

 Harinani has also created several commissioned works for the Sheraton Waikiki and participated as a lead artist in several community mural projects including the Hawaii Kakou Mural at the Hawaii Convention Center, the Helumoa Mural at Sheraton Waikiki and the Mural at Camp Mokuleia. Harinani recently participated in the Maoli Arts Month Wearable Art Fashion Show as a designer and continues to teach at the University of Hawaii while maintaining an active studio in the back of Palolo Valley.

 

 The winning bidder will also be encouraged to bring a group to Harinani’s studio for a private 2 hour 30 minute art class for up to eight people. This experience can be tailored to the age and interests of the group. All materials and simple refreshments are included. This is a perfect opportunity to encourage creativity in an extraordinary setting with a gifted artist and teacher.

Also included in this package is a collection of ten children’s books donated by Native Books and illustrated by various Aulani artists including three from Harinani Orme. Other artists featured include Solomon Enos, Meleanna Meyer, Doug Tolentino, James Rumford, Butch Helemano, Brooke Parker and Imaikalani Kalahele.

  _________________________________________________________________________________

 Al Lagunero is a creative genius and a profoundly grounded Hawaiian artist. He graduated from Farrington High School and furthered his art education at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, Arizona State University, and the San Francisco Art Institute. He draws upon his life experiences and many travels to the Americas, Japan, Italy, France, Belgium, and Spain in creating his paintings. Since 1959, he has exhibited his exceptional acrylics in local, national, and inmailternational venues. Al is also a tireless volunteer and for the last 22 years he has been giving back in the areas of art, science and spirituality.

Lagunero has spend many years in the art industry - as a free-lance illustrator, artist, gallery owner, and director of a Hawaiian culture and educational center in Maui. Currently, he is a full-time artist who works out of his art studio and private showroom in Kula, Maui.

 Al’s work is prominently featured at the entrance to the Makahiki Restaurant and in the Laniwai Spa. Al was also a lead artist on the Helumoa Mural and the Hawaii Kakou Community Mural projects. His work is featured in Hawaiian Hall at the Bishop Museum.

 

 

Alʻs piece, Cult, Culture, Civilization is about ulu migration. Itʻs original title La’a (with two birds, one red one black, horizontal orientation, white borders. This piece was a consideration for the Aulani Resort. This acrylic on canvas measures 60” x 36” and is valued at $7,500.

 Al Lagunero acrylic on canvas, Cult, Culture, Civilization - $7,500

 *Studio tour and lunch for two - $400

 Airfare for two to Maui w/car rental for day - $400

*Date/time to be mutually agreed upon   ________________________________________________________________________________________

Carl F. K. Pao was educated here in the islands at the University of Hawaii as well as at the Elan Arts Academy in New Zealand. Carl is both a sculptor and a painter, having done ceramics for many years, then turning his attention to his paintings. He is also an accomplished art educator and curator. He currently is an art teacher at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama campus. Carl’s strong, graphic works make clear statements about his maoli aesthetics and mindset. His work is in many private and public collections including Bishop Museum, State Foundation for Culture and the Arts, and several ali’i trusts. Carlʻs work can also be found adorning the outside walls of the Aulani Resort. He has translated a chant that relates specifically to this place, using an alphabet system that changes letters to a graphic statement.

 

Haloa

Acrylic on Wood Panel
36” x 96”
$6000


  ________________________________________________________________________________________

“It has been too long that Hawaiian art has been associated with plastic tikis and ocean paintings.” Jordan Souza

“For the world to take the Art of Hawaii seriously, we must move our art into a more contemporary context. By studying ideas and cultural practices of the past, we can push Native Hawaiian Art forms into the future. My work incorporates many ancient symbols and forms, which I try to incorporate into my art. I try to express and show these things with mixed media. The woodcarving that I do is aimed at honoring the Hawaiian Culture, with a fresh abstract perspective. I also choose to use woods that would otherwise be discarded for green waste. I like to think that I give wood the chance to speak and tell a story one last time before it is absorbed back into the earth.”

 Jordan Souza is a young carver of extraordinary talent. Trained in New Zealand and Hawai‘i, Jordan has a clear and cultural aesthetic that has impressed collectors throughout the Pacific. Jordan has done an entry ki‘i for Aulani Resort as well as a large wood wall sculpture. Jordan runs the wood studio at Windward Community College and inspires his students to do their best work through creative and cultural exploration.

Jordan’s featured piece is an intricately carved koa wood paddle, which measures 67” long and 12” wide, valued at $1,400.

 The winning bidder will be able to take a group of up to fifteen people to Jordan’s wood studio at Windward Community College to see his creative process first hand. The visit includes both an extensive tour of the innovative and modern studio facilities along with a one of a kind live demonstration. Visitors are given the chance to witness this traditional craft done in a contemporary fashion.

Segment Value: $2,400
Jordan’s wood sculpture - $1,400
*Studio tour for up to fifteen people - $1,000
*Date/time to be mutually agreed upon

  ________________________________________________________________________________________

Dalani Tanahy, a life-long artist, practiced discipline and patience pursuing her childhood passions of crocheting, knitting, embroidering and quilting. These hands-on art forms, prepared her for her real love - kapa making. Dalani made her first i`e kuku and hohoa beaters with the help of kapa maker Kawai Aona-Ueoka.  Dalani worked with many kapa kumu through the years and has taught kapa making at the Cultural Learning Center at Ka’ala in Wai’anae . She is the only full time kapa maker in Hawai‘i today . 

 “He Kumu Wai ‘Ole” means the water without a source.  This `olelo no`eau refers to a story from Kawaihapai, O`ahu where fresh water miraculously   appeared during a drought.   I am reminded that although we did not learn kapa making from our source…our grandmothers and Kupuna, as Kupuna ourselves, our grandchildren and our many students, will learn this art from us. Kapa making has given me opportunities to work alone quietly as well as encounter places and people throughout the world.  It seems that I am on my second, third, and fourth circle now as I go forward with my work of teaching, cultivating and developing as a kapa artist.  I am very pleased to be able to share some of what I have learned in the hopes of giving people a small appreciation

of the seemingly simple yet complex work of my Hawaiian ancestors.”     Dalani Tanahy

Dalani’s kapa inspirations are in every room of Aulani—her patterns have been included in sheet linen, shower curtains and other embellishments. Dalani also created kapa that became part of the interior ceiling of Aulani’s lobby. She is a regular practitioner featured at Aulani, talking about planting wauke and learning about dye plants. 

Pictured here is a singular piece of kapa Dalani has made and decorated. This framed piece measures    29” x 29” and is valued at $1,800.

 Dalani is also looking forward to creating a hands on kapa making experience in Wai‘anae for a group of ten participants.

 Segment Value - $2,300
Framed kapa, 29” x 29” - $1,800
 *Wai‘anae field trip to Ka‘ala Learning Center to visit a wauke patch, learn about kapa making, and then make a piece of kapa together for a group of ten - $500

*Date/time to be mutually agreed upon

 ________________________________________________________________________________________

Jerry Vasconcellos was born and raised in the back of Kalihi Valley and has been making stone sculptures for over 40 years, using found materials from the along Kalihi Stream and forest, quarries and stream beds throughout the Islands. Jerry has done countless shows and his work has been commissioned for numerous private and public sites. His most recent commission, the Makawalu Vortex, is being created for the Cancer Center in Kaka’ako. Several of Jerry’s pieces are in the Laniwai Spa at the Aulani Resort.

 

 Jerry’s donated piece, entitled Rock Dance, incorporates his favorite materials wood and stone; it measures 16” x 22” x 10” and is valued at $950.

 

 

 

 

 

The winning bid includes a visit to Jerry’s studio in the back of Kalihi Valley. Jerry’s studio is located in a historic home that at one time hosted a thriving art community in the 1930s and 1940s.

Segment Value: $1,450
Jerry Vasconcellos’ wood and rock sculpture,
Rock Dance - $950
*Kalihi Valley studio and art colony tour for up
to five people - $500

*Date/time to be mutually agreed upon

  ________________________________________________________________________________________

Some Links featuring maoli artists:

                         MAMo Wearable Art Show 2012, You Tube by Diane Ko on Harinani Orme’s wearable art designs (9 minute segment)

                         The Art of Aulani – Honolulu Star-Advertiser Photo Gallery

                         Hawaii Convention Center Unveils First Permanent Native Hawaiian Mural, November 1, 2011

                         You Tube:  Hawai`i Kakou Mural Project Day 6 at Hawai`i Convention Center, October 8, 2011

                        Aulani Showcases One of the World’s Largest Private Collections of Contemporary Hawaiian Art (Click Gallery photos to see “Hina” on exterior wall)

                         Contemporary PIKO and HOEA artists’ works on exhibit in UH Manoa Hamilton Library’s Bridge Gallery, June 6 – August 28, 2011

                         Aulani Native Hawaiian Artist Interviews (Click play on “Aulani Artist Program”)

 

 


 

The Queen Emma Collection

Featuring Artists from Aulani

Silent Auction 

Mark Chai        Kahi Ching     Kaui' Chun     Mary Downes     Kim Duffett     Solomon Enos     Henry Ha'o    

Hanalei Hopfe    Georg James     Lucia Tarallo Jensen       Natalie Jensen     Paulette Kahalepuna   

Imaikalani Kalahele      Al Lagunero        Meleanna Aluli Meyer      Harinani Orme      Carl F.K. Pao     

Brook Kapukuniahi Parker    Jordan Souza     Pooloa Tolentino     Jerry Vasconcellos

 
Mark Chai 
A 3-D, reuse, recycled driven artist exploring the thematic thread of illumination. Mark’s designs and shapes are constantly evolving. His inspiration comes from his love for the ocean, his fascination with the structures of exotic flora and fauna, and a growing awareness of his genealogy. His vessels reflect the play of ao and po –light and dark, female and male, physical and spiritual – the fundamental sense of balance in the Hawaiian ancestral consciousness. He has a 3 piece sculpture entitles Play which is made entirely of recylced materials. The installation consisting of a lupe manu kite, a konane board/hukilau net, and a holua sled hang in the lobby of the Disney Aulani resort.

 
 
 
Surf Legend
Recycled Plastic with Koa Wood Base
16” x 12” x 5”
$350
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 


 
Kahi Ching
 Ching was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. A true child prodigy, he began drawing and painting at an early age. He was sponsored with art classes at the Honolulu Academy of Arts and studied alongside adults in his life drawing class. He was also enrolled in private studio lessons with instructor Larry Roberson. He sold his very first painting at age 11.

At age 16, Kahi entered his first art contest. He took second place at the Industrial Arts Fair with his first attempt at copper sculpting. Kahi took on many, if not all, of the art projects that came his way during school, including theater set painting working alongside Ron Bright. He was also the first student to paint two large-scale murals on the walls of Castle High School. At age 17, Kahi submitted 8 images to the 53rd Annual Scholastic Art Awards competition. He took home four gold keys and Best Portfolio at the State Level and was sent to New York to compete at the National Level. Kahi won a Hallmark Honor Prize for his pencil drawing entitled, “Curios” and a scholarship to Rudolph Schaeffer School of Design in San Francisco. He also attended The School of Holography, San Francisco.
 Upon Kahi’s return to the islands, he continued with his art and ventured into different fields, including construction, concrete furniture, jewelry, bonsai, and sign painting, all of which have contributed to his engineering of special art projects. Kahi faced occasional criticism for venturing into different venues of art – painting, ceramics, and wood sculpting, just to name a few. He had a long-term battle within himself with the idea of conforming to the notion of conventional art and became conscious of the fact that creating art that comes from within himself is most meaningful to him as an artist rather than to please someone else (although if that someone else appreciates his vision, that’s a bonus!).   With that said, Kahi continues to challenge himself with new mediums in addition to mastering the primary, and that is simply Kahi’s “style”. He “disappeared” from the “art scene” and kept a low profile while continuing his signature pieces, which, for the most part, have not been on display until today.
 With an entrepreneurial attitude and over 30 years as an artist, he created Kahi Gallery (2006), an extension of his own artistic and technical vision, a place where he can be an artist full time.

 Banana Leaves
Photograph
14” x 36”
$250

 

Kau'i Chun

Kau‘i teaches art and literature at Halau Lokahi, a Public Charter School. He received his B.A. and an M.F.A from the University of Hawai‘I where he is also currently completing his doctorate in Education. Kau‘i enjoys working on large canvases and with complex layered subjects. His work is in both private and public collections.

Mo‘oku‘auhau o ka ‘Aina: He Huaka‘i o ka ‘Uhane
Genealogy of the Land: A Spititual Voyage
Skin dry skin
Skin navel
Skin rocky
Skin of rotten Vulcan
Wrinkled and honeyed
Skin lava Fiery
Skin veiled, skin silky
Skin, skin, skin
Amourous skin

 

 

 

Moana Uli
Acylic on Canvas
15” x 15”
$400


Mary Downes

Long time HawaI‘i resident Mary Downes has a keen sense of humor and playfulness. She couples these talents with a great passion for quilting. Mary made Hawaiian quilts for many years until she was forced to stop for health reasons. Rather than give up quilting, she went to machine quilts that are filled with intricate details and nuances. She has two large size quilts in several community spaces within the Aulani Resort. Her quilts bring smiles to everyone with their bright colors and kama‘ina reflections.

 
 
 
Lilikoi
Quilt
24” x 24”
$250
 
 
 
 

 

 


 
 

 

 


Great Wave of Waikiki
Quilt
54” x 36”
$2800
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onolicious
Quilt
40” x 27”
$480

 

 

 

 

 

  
Kim Duffett

 Originally, from Ohio, Kim Duffett was born to an artist mother and a scientist father. These two inclinations have followed Duffett his entire life and have colored all his explorations into the creative process. He has resided in Hawaii since 1979. “Living in these soulful islands of Hawaii, I feel a sense of ‘Aina a the core of my being and this is the source of my inspiration in sculpture. For me, sculpture is a way to express the many unspoken manifestations of the earth that words fail to capture.” Inspired by the beauty of Hawaii and its ancient culture, Kim continues to work primarily in wood and bronze. In 1982, Duffett began a three-year sailing voyage in the South Pacific and in contact with carvers in Fiji, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. He continues to work at his studio in Manoa Valley.
 


Ka Leo I Hakani
(The Voice of the Wind)
Bronze
1/4 life size
$5300
 


 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ku Makani
(Rising Wind)
Bronze
1/2 Life Size
$5700

 

 

 

 

 

Solomon Enos

Solomon Enos, one of the most extraordinary contemporary artists to come out of Hawai’i today.

His signature pieces at Aulani evoke the colorist Minookian; and depict people and place participating in the Hawaiian season of thanksgiving, known as the Makahiki. 
 
 Solomon is currently one of the six artists in the Honolulu Museum of Art’s Tenth Biennial now showing at the Spaulding House.   Solomon has won national recognition for his alternate-history “Polyfantastica” project, shown last year at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. Taking inspiration from science fiction, gaming culture and the Internet, “Polyfantastica” exists as a comic book, website, modeled figures, paintings and more. Solomon has contributed to a variety of highly visible community murals including the Bishop Museum’s Hawaiian Hall prophecy chant mural, the Helumoa Mural at the Sheraton Waikiki, the Hawaii Kakou Community Mural at the Hawaii Convention Center, and POW WOW 2012 to name a few. Solomon’s commissioned works include entrance pieces to the Sheraton Waikiki, in room art for the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, the painting, A Dozen Concrete Pillars, for architect firm WCIT and a recent multi-media exhibition renovation at Sea Life Park. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lualua lei
Pen and Ink
F-13” by 17”
$1500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Makua
Pen and Ink
F-13” by 17”
$1500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Makaha
Pen and Ink
F-13” by 17”
$1500
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kaʻena
Pen and Ink
F-13” by 17”
$1500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waiʻanae
Pen and Ink
F-13” by 17”
$1500
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Henry Ha‘o

Henry Ha‘o, a native son of Hawai‘i,
is the youngest artist to be
awarded a commission by the Hawai‘i State Foundation of Culture and the Arts. An accomplished watercolorist and oil painter, he now translates the local scenery and the tradition of hula through acrylic paint on canvas. His original paintings along with reproductions can be found at Na Mea Hawaii at Ward Warehouse and the Sunshine Gallery. Ha‘o was commissioned by the Disney Aulani Resort to do paintings that can be found in many of their suites.  


Waimanalo
Oil on Canvas
24” x 18”
$600 


 
Hanalei Hopfe

“Kaniwai Kaua is made from pohaku (stone). He is the conch shell blower, the warrior that calls to organize Na koa. Kanaka Maoli in ancient days until today uses the Pu (conch shell) to raise our call to our “kuleana.” Networkers, managers, politicians, and people in communications are great examples of professionals who can use the man that flows from Ka pu o kaniwai kaua.”     -Hanalei Hopfe

 
Kauiwai Kaua
Pohaku (Basalt)
10” x 11” x 4”
$3200
 
“Na Holokai is carved out of pohaku (stone). He is a seafarer. A  traveler who works and travels by sea. He sees the ocean as a watery highway, which is a means to connect us instead separating us between islands and continents. Networkers oversea investors are people who can use knowledge and skills of such a man.”             Hanalei Hopfe

Na Holokai
Pohaku (Basalt)
10” x 12” x 4”
$2800
 


 
Georg James
A native of Massachusetts, James traveled with the New York Scenic Artist Union, designing sets in many regional theatres. Twenty years of film set direction for major media advertising companies including IBM, Coca Cola, and Mercedes-Benz resulted in the desire to have a more personal relationship with art. In 1995, James moved to Hawai‘i. His artwork can be found in both public and private collections including, Kapiolani Women’s and Children’s Hospital, the Rainbow Lanai and Kalia Tower at the Hilton Hawaiian Village, the Ritz-Carlton Kapalua, the Trump Beachwalk Hotel, and a series of whimsical marine themed paintings for the guest suites at Disney’s Aulani Resort.

 
 
 Hello Aloha
Gyclee
48” x 26”
$250
 
 
 

 

 


 
 
Lucia Tarallo Jensen

Lucia is of Italian ancestry and has been part of the maoli art scene for many decades in part due to her marriage to carver Rocky Jensen. Lucia is an artist in her own right with a special ability in making lei hulu.
 She is also one of the founding members of Hale Naua III, a native Hawaiian arts organization founded in the 1970s to promote maoli arts. Hale Naua III has been instrumental in keeping the maoli art movement growing. They have organized numerous shows both here in Hawai‘i, on the U.S. continent and abroad. She is a tireless advocate for maoli arts and with her daughter collaborated on an important resource book entitled daughters of Haumea.

 
 
 
 
Aha Hula
Red Feather Cape
22” x 18”
$6000
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natalie Jensen

Natalie Jensen is a well know kahili maker, painter and photographer. She is the child of master carver Rocky Jensen, and historian and arts advocate Lucia Jensen.

Natalie lives on HawaI‘i Island close to her parents and they continue to work as a creative ohana. As a photographer with a cultural lens, she created a series of kakau, or tattooed macro pieces of art from spent time with some of the work crew at the Aulani Resort. Her contemporary piece is found in Painted Sky, the teen spa at Aulani.

 

Phases of the Sun (set of 4)
Acrylic on Canvas
12” x 12”
$900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paulette Kahalepuna

Paulette, the daughter of hulu maker Aunty Mary Lou Kekuewa is master feather artisan in her own right. She continues to practice her craft out of the parents feather shop on Kapahulu Avenue. Paulette has continued to do contemporary work and her pieces are found in the VIP rooms of the Aulani Resort.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kahili

Rooster Tail
9” x 24”
$450

 

Imaikalani Kalahele

Imaikalani is one the most colorful and long time artist and activists on the Maoli art scene. As a poet, writer, painter, sculptor, and musician –Imaikalani has at his fingertips every form of expression. “I, Dale Alton Imaikalani Muerlott Kalahele, was born in the ahu of Nu’uanu, O’ahu. His mother is Rebecca Kelilolalo Kalahele, her genealogy is related to Maui and Hawai’i island families. Kalahele and his wife, Eunice have 4 children and 14 grandchildren.

 “All of my art is based on my Hawaiian experience. It is reflected through my sense of design, form, shape, and philosophy. My sense of maoli, of my kulaiwi and of Moana Nui, is primal in my work as an artist, poet and muscian. It is very difficult for me to separate any of these elements. I feel that I am part of a generation that is entrusted with the advancement of our our culture. My work is traditional because I, in fact, come from 2,000 years of evolutionary tradition and that tradition insits that my art be of some use to my culture.”  Imaikalani Kalahele

 

Aina
acyrlic on canvas
4 panels 7" x 90" each
$900

Hui O Hana
Color Pen and Ink
8” x 11”
$250

Orginal Paper Cut Out
$150 

Al Lagunero

“Except for the Migration piece (painted in 2011), the works are recent (2012).

I am staying home more now and enjoying living on the slope of Haleakala. The gardens have been my enjoyment daily -- and I think they are reflected in a few of the works; and so has Ho’okipa Beach. Often, my works go to the reveals of Hawaiian history or personal experiences; and it incorporates documenting the bridge between the physical and spiritual weave. During the production of these particular recent works, I experienced a delayed artistic block, which revealed one important thought to me; and that was ‘perhaps I should drop narrative work.’ In these works, I wanted to share experiences - which I know are unique to every individual - and yet be able to share such simple things as walking in my garden or visiting the shore at Ho’okipa.

The comparison to earlier works is a part of this exhibit with the migration piece which narrative covers the period 400-450 A. D. as a resource of inspiration. The piece contains ‘story blocks’ as part of its inherent composition into which pegboards to cultural anthropology and human behavior are symbolized to contain the story.”  -Al Lagunero

 

Kihapai (a garden patch)
(morning light under the ti stalks)      
Acrylic on Canvas
48” x 36”
$1200

 

 

 

‘Owai (who?)
(small figurative)
Acrylic on canvas
30” x 40”
$1200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meleanna Aluli Meyer

Meleanna is an artist, filmmaker, writer, and art educator whose emphasis is on the integrating of culture and the arts. Meleanna teaches throughout the Hawaiian Islands. She was the visual conductor for several mural projects including one for a community garden in Hilo, the arting-in-place mural at the Sheraton Waikiki, and one of five kumu to facilitate the Hawaii Loa Ku Like Kakou masterpiece at the Hawaii Convention Center. 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ke Haʻalipo Nei, Ua Hala Lakou, Ua Hala Au No
Print
11” by 14”
$500 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harinani Orme

  “Stone carving ki‘i pohaku, or images in stone. This rock art provides a unique look into the past, but unfortunately, no one knows for sure what all the petroglyphs truly mean, just as it is not known exactly where each image was carved.

 There are over a hundred locations throughout the Islands that contain Hawaiian petroglyphs. The largest concentrations are found on the Island of Hawai‘i. The biggest petroglyph field in Hawai‘i and all of Polynesia is located at Pu‘uloa in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. At the Pu‘uloa site, you can view over 23,000 petroglyphs. Another large field is at Puako Petroglyph Preserve, which has more than 3,000 petroglyphs.

 Petroglyphs are not placed randomly. Some places that have only isolated petroglyphs probably mark important trail junctions or burial sites. Most of these ancient carvings are found in groups in places that the Hawaiian believed had a concentration of mana, or divine power. These locations became areas of prayer and respect.

 The Hawaiian petroglyphs that are categorized as descriptive are images recognizable as subjects (sails, canoes, paddles, fishhooks, fans) and human figures.” -Harinani Orme       

Ki‘i Pohaku
Framed Acrylic on Watercolor Paper
24” x 24”
$1800
Ki‘i Kahili
Framed Acrylic on Watercolor Paper
24” x 24”
$1800 

  Ki‘i Pohaku Pe'a Heke
Framed Acrylic on Watercolor Paper
24” x 24”
$1800

Carl F.K. Pao

Carl was educated here in the islands at the University of Hawaii as well as at the Elan Arts Academy in New Zealand. Carl is both a sculptor and a painter, having done ceramics for many years, then turning his attention to his paintings. He is also an accomplished art educator and curator. He currently is an art teacher at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama campus. Carl’s strong, graphic works make clear statements about his maoli aesthetics and mindset. His work is in many private and public collections including Bishop Museum, State Foundation for Culture and the Arts, and several ali’i trusts. Carlʻs work can also be found adorning the outside walls of the Aulani Resort. He has translated a chant that relates specifically to this place, using an alphabet system that changes letters to a graphic statement.

 

 Ua

Arcylic on Wood
20x25
$695

 

 

 

Ke Kumu

Acrylic on Canvas
36” x 24”
$2895

 

 

 

 

Brook Kapukuniahi Parker

Brook is focused on channeling our Hawaiian past down on canvas. Using oils and methods taught by his kumu, his strong realism is the focalpoint of his work. As a historian and a descendant of chiefs, his painting is primarily focused on ali‘i subjects. The son of an artist, he grew up knowing what path he would take. He is currently working on the illustration of a new edition of Ruling Chiefs by Kamehameha Publishing. His ahu‘pua‘a depcition can be found in the lobby of Disney’s Aulani Resort.

 

 

 

 

Edith Kanakaole and Daughters
Oil on Masonite
16” x 12”
$250

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jordan Souza

 Jordan is a young carver of extraordinary talent. Trained in New Zealand and Hawai‘i, Jordan has a clear and cultural aesthetic that has impressed collectors throughout the Pacific. Jordan has done an entry ki‘i for Aulani Resort as well as a large wood wall sculpture. Jordan runs the wood studio at Windward Community College and inspires his students to do their best work through creative and cultural exploration.

 

 

Vessels

(Set of 2)
Bronze
$3500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Silence

2 ‘iwi on Stone Base with Carved Ear
$1800

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Pooloa Tolentino

Pooloa is a gifted artist and musician. A genealogist by training, and nature, he pays homage to the past through the meticulous attention to detail captured in his images and the stories they tell. Pooloa is extremely well versed in the wahi pana of the islands, Hawaiian gods and goddess’ and the myths that surround our deities. His paintings are always layered with kaona and depth –enjoyed on many levels.

Hapa Haole Hula Girl
Chalk pastel on paper
28” x 30”
$600
 
Mahina
Collagraph on paper
18” x 18”
$300

 

 
 Po‘opua‘a
Chalk pastel on paper
24” x 30”
$600
 

 

Kanaloa & Kane
(study for Aulani Resort)
Chalk pastel on paper
24” x 24”
$1600

 

 

Jerry Vasconcellos

Jerry was born and raised in the back of Kalihi Valley and has been making stone sculptures for over 40 years, using found materials from the along Kalihi Stream and forest, quarries and stream beds throughout the Islands. Jerry has done countless shows and his work has been commissioned for numerous private and public sites. His most recent commission, the Makawalu Vortex, is being created for the Cancer Center in Kaka’ako. Several of Jerry’s pieces are in the Laniwai Spa at the Aulani Resort.

 

 

 

 

Koa Facial Figure
Koa on Pohaku (Basalt)
3” x 12” x 2”
$500
Bi Facial
Pohaku (Basalt) on Kamani Wood
10” x 5” x 2”
$600
 
  
Robed One
Pohaku (Basalt)
10” x 12” x 5”
$700
Facial
Kohohala Wood on White Marble Base
4” x 12” x 3”
$600
 
  
 Floating Rock
Pohaku (Basalt)
2” x 4” x 6”
$500
Floating Rock
Pohaku (Basalt)
4” x 2” x 6”
$400
 

 Floating Rock-Unseaworthy
Pohaku (Basalt) Bowl
10” x 5” x 11”
$750
 

 

 

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